The Lords of Dublin in the Age of Reformation

37.50

Colm Lennon

A valuable survey of the topography and history of late medieval Dublin and of public affairs in general in the period 1548- 1613.

Hardback

ISBN: 9780716524199 Categories: ,

Description

This study of establishment Dublin in the Elizabethan period draws on the consider- able body of documentation which survives in the city archives and elsewhere – assembly rolls from 1550, treasury and sheriffs records from 1541, and minutes of the alderman’s bench the corporation from 1567 – and also on a wide variety of other contemporary writings and sources.

The Dublin of the period saw the rise of the aldermanic elite to a dominant role in civic politics and society. Dr Lennon explores the world of these patricians against the background of civic privilege, state policy and the growth of recusancy. He is also concerned to show how they consolidated their social position through marriage with fellow-patricians and gentry, and investment in urban and rural properties. Reconstructed biographies of some hundred leading councillors are supplied. In the course of the study, the author provides a valuable survey of the topography and history of late medieval Dublin and of public affairs in general in the period 1548- 1613.

CONTENTS
Introduction
1. Late medieval Dublin as setting
2. Continuity and change in the polity of Dublin, 1548-1613
3. The social standing of the patricians, 1550-1620
4. Civic privilege and state policy, 1548-97
5. Religion and the patriciate, 1560-97
6. Recusancy and the defence of privilege, 1597-1613
Conclusion
Appendices
I. The humble petition of the Mayor and Cyttisens, June 1597
II. Prosopography of aldermen of Dublin, 1550-1620

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Colm Lennon is a Member of the Royal Irish Academy and Professor Emeritus of Maynooth University. He has written extensively on social, political and religious history in early modern Ireland. Some of his publications include: IHTA no. 19, Dublin, part II, 1610 to 1756 (Dublin, 2008); with John Montague John Rocque’s Dublin: a guide to the Georgian city (Dublin, 2010); Sixteenth-century Ireland (Dublin, 1994); and That field of glory: the story of Clontarf from battleground to garden suburb (Dublin, 2014).